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Collision Tech Conference Moving To New Orleans In 2016

NEW ORLEANS – New Orleans will welcome Collision, the sister event to Web Summit, the biggest technology conference in Europe. […]

6/22/2015 | Read Story »

After Hurricane Katrina: How federal aid helped the region rebuild, improve Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The new permanent London Avenue canal pumping station is under construction where the canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The London Avenue canal was the site of two of numerous levee breaches that doomed New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to governments, individuals and businesses in Louisiana. A key element of that package, one of the largest in history, was $14.489 billion to rebuild and upgrades the levee system that surrounds the New Orleans area and which failed during the storm, leading to catastrophic flooding. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The new permanent London Avenue canal pumping station is under construction where the canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The London Avenue canal was the site of two of numerous levee breaches that doomed New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to governments, individuals and businesses in Louisiana. A key element of that package, one of the largest in history, was $14.489 billion to rebuild and upgrades the levee system that surrounds the New Orleans area and which failed during the storm, leading to catastrophic flooding. Associated Press photo by Greg Pearson — President George W. Bush walks with Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, left, and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Monday, Sept. 5, 2005, as they make their way into the state’s Office of Emergency Preparedness for a briefing after Hurricane Katrina. Associated Press photo by Greg Pearson — President George W. Bush walks with Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, left, and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Monday, Sept. 5, 2005, as they make their way into the state’s Office of Emergency Preparedness for a briefing after Hurricane Katrina. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — A new permanent pumping station is under construction where the London Avenue Canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The 17th Street Canal and the London Avenue Canal, both built to drain rainwater from the city, both suffered levee breaches that eventually inundated New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to businesses, individuals and governments in Louisiana, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrades the New Orleans-area levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — A new permanent pumping station is under construction where the London Avenue Canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The 17th Street Canal and the London Avenue Canal, both built to drain rainwater from the city, both suffered levee breaches that eventually inundated New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to businesses, individuals and governments in Louisiana, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrades the New Orleans-area levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The 17th Street Canal was the site of one of the many levee breaches that doomed New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A new permanent pumping station is being built where the canal meets the lake at Bucktown. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to the region, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrade the levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The 17th Street Canal was the site of one of the many levee breaches that doomed New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A new permanent pumping station is being built where the canal meets the lake at Bucktown. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to the region, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrade the levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The 17th Street Canal was the site of one of the many levee breaches that inundated New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A new permanent pumping station is being built where the canal meets the lake at Bucktown. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to the region, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrade the levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The 17th Street Canal was the site of one of the many levee breaches that inundated New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A new permanent pumping station is being built where the canal meets the lake at Bucktown. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to the region, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrade the levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — A new permanent pumping station is under construction where the London Avenue Canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The 17th Street Canal and the London Avenue Canal, both built to drain rainwater from the city, both suffered levee breaches that eventually inundated New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to businesses, individuals and governments in Louisiana, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrades the New Orleans-area levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — A new permanent pumping station is under construction where the London Avenue Canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The 17th Street Canal and the London Avenue Canal, both built to drain rainwater from the city, both suffered levee breaches that eventually inundated New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to businesses, individuals and governments in Louisiana, including $14.5 billion to rebuild and upgrades the New Orleans-area levee system. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — A new permanent pumping station is under construction where the Orleans Avenue Canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The Orleans canal was the only one of the city’s three major outfall canals whose floodwalls did not breach folowing Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A key element of the federal government’s aid package has been a $14.5 billion plan to upgrade the region’s flood defenses. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — A new permanent pumping station is under construction where the Orleans Avenue Canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The Orleans canal was the only one of the city’s three major outfall canals whose floodwalls did not breach folowing Hurricane Katrina in 2005. A key element of the federal government’s aid package has been a $14.5 billion plan to upgrade the region’s flood defenses. Advocate staff photo by Bill Feig — Chuck Bulot and Mike Bleazard sit in front of their FEMA trailers in August 2007; they were among tens of thousands of residents across the region that took temporary shelter in travel trailers provided by the government. Bulot was waiting for Road Home money to fix his family’s home, seen in the background. Advocate staff photo by Bill Feig — Chuck Bulot and Mike Bleazard sit in front of their FEMA trailers in August 2007; they were among tens of thousands of residents across the region that took temporary shelter in travel trailers provided by the government. Bulot was waiting for Road Home money to fix his family’s home, seen in the background. Alex Brandon/AP — Iowa, La., Mayor Margo Racca, New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, and Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco accept a check from U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development deputy secretary Roy Bernardi at a news conference in New Orleans on Tuesday, July 11, 2006. The check was to help fund the state’s Road Home program for hurricane recovery. Alex Brandon/AP — Iowa, La., Mayor Margo Racca, New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin, and Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco accept a check from U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development deputy secretary Roy Bernardi at a news conference in New Orleans on Tuesday, July 11, 2006. The check was to help fund the state’s Road Home program for hurricane recovery. Advocate staff photo by Richard Alan Hannon — Thousands of FEMA trailers are staged in Lottie in Pointe Coupee Parish after Hurricane Katrina. Tens of thousands of families in the New Orleans region lived in these tiny trailers for months and even years after the storm as they struggled to rebuild their flood-damaged homes. Advocate staff photo by Richard Alan Hannon — Thousands of FEMA trailers are staged in Lottie in Pointe Coupee Parish after Hurricane Katrina. Tens of thousands of families in the New Orleans region lived in these tiny trailers for months and even years after the storm as they struggled to rebuild their flood-damaged homes. Gerald Herbert/AP — Edwin D. Weber Jr. stands inside the FEMA trailer he shares with his brother Richard Weber, right, in New Orleans. New Orleans officials cited the last 221 temporary FEMA trailers left in the city as blight and gave the last folks living in them until the end of 2010 to move out . Gerald Herbert/AP — Edwin D. Weber Jr. stands inside the FEMA trailer he shares with his brother Richard Weber, right, in New Orleans. New Orleans officials cited the last 221 temporary FEMA trailers left in the city as blight and gave the last folks living in them until the end of 2010 to move out . Bill Haber/AP — A FEMA trailer sits in the front yard of a Lakeview home in 2009. After repeated extensions, meant to give people more time to rebuild their storm-damaged homes or to find other more permanent places to stay, FEMA was preparing to enforce a May 1 deadline to vacate the trailers. Bill Haber/AP — A FEMA trailer sits in the front yard of a Lakeview home in 2009. After repeated extensions, meant to give people more time to rebuild their storm-damaged homes or to find other more permanent places to stay, FEMA was preparing to enforce a May 1 deadline to vacate the trailers. Advocate staff photo by Patrick Semansky — Construction workers build new residential halls on the lake campus of Southern University at New Orleans on Thursday, March 26, 2009. With most of the campus having to work out of temporary trailers since Hurricane Katrina, SUNO and FEMA officials were still negotiating funding for building repairs. Advocate staff photo by Patrick Semansky — Construction workers build new residential halls on the lake campus of Southern University at New Orleans on Thursday, March 26, 2009. With most of the campus having to work out of temporary trailers since Hurricane Katrina, SUNO and FEMA officials were still negotiating funding for building repairs. Charles Dharapak/AP — President George W. Bush accompanied by FEMA official Gil Jamieson, rear, speaks to a FEMA contractor as he watches him remove debris from the Lower Ninth Ward on Wednesday, March 8, 2006. Charles Dharapak/AP — President George W. Bush accompanied by FEMA official Gil Jamieson, rear, speaks to a FEMA contractor as he watches him remove debris from the Lower Ninth Ward on Wednesday, March 8, 2006. Douglas Collier/The Town Talk — The Carnival Cruise Ship Ecstasy sits astern of the USS Iwo Jima at the New Orleans Riverwalk, where on Monday, Sept. 12, 2005, it began housing members of the New Orleans Police Department, and later, their families. A second Carnival ship, the Sensation, docked Monday afternoon. It would house members of the New Orleans Fire Department and Emergency Medical Services. Douglas Collier/The Town Talk — The Carnival Cruise Ship Ecstasy sits astern of the USS Iwo Jima at the New Orleans Riverwalk, where on Monday, Sept. 12, 2005, it began housing members of the New Orleans Police Department, and later, their families. A second Carnival ship, the Sensation, docked Monday afternoon. It would house members of the New Orleans Fire Department and Emergency Medical Services. Advocate staff photo by Travis Spradling. — A constant stream of trucks carrying Katrina debris files into the Old Gentilly Landfill in New Orleans East on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2005. The landfill, which accepts only debris, was hastily opened by state officials in the wake of the storm, and quickly became one of the busiest dumps in the state. Environmentalists raised questions about whether the landfill was appropriate, but officials from the state Department of Environmental Quality said it met all requirements. Advocate staff photo by Travis Spradling. — A constant stream of trucks carrying Katrina debris files into the Old Gentilly Landfill in New Orleans East on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2005. The landfill, which accepts only debris, was hastily opened by state officials in the wake of the storm, and quickly became one of the busiest dumps in the state. Environmentalists raised questions about whether the landfill was appropriate, but officials from the state Department of Environmental Quality said it met all requirements. Bill Haber/AP– A FEMA trailer sits in the front yard of a home in the Lakeview section of New Orleans in 2009. After repeated extensions, meant to give people more time to rebuild their storm-damaged homes or to find other more permanent places to stay, FEMA now appears ready to enforce its May 1 deadline. In notices to residents, the agency said it would seek Department of Justice help to repossess units that 2005 hurricane victims remain in after this weekend. Bill Haber/AP– A FEMA trailer sits in the front yard of a home in the Lakeview section of New Orleans in 2009. After repeated extensions, meant to give people more time to rebuild their storm-damaged homes or to find other more permanent places to stay, FEMA now appears ready to enforce its May 1 deadline. In notices to residents, the agency said it would seek Department of Justice help to repossess units that 2005 hurricane victims remain in after this weekend. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The new permanent London Avenue canal pumping station is under construction where the canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The London Avenue canal was the site of two of numerous levee breaches that doomed New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to governments, individuals and businesses in Louisiana. A key element of that package, one of the largest in history, was $14.489 billion to rebuild and upgrades the levee system that surrounds the New Orleans area and which failed during the storm, leading to catastrophic flooding. Advocate staff photo by JOHN McCUSKER — The new permanent London Avenue canal pumping station is under construction where the canal meets Lake Pontchartrain. The London Avenue canal was the site of two of numerous levee breaches that doomed New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In the years following the flood, the federal government promised more than $50 billion in recovery aid to governments, individuals and businesses in Louisiana. A key element of that package, one of the largest in history, was $14.489 billion to rebuild and upgrades the levee system that surrounds the New Orleans area and which failed during the storm, leading to catastrophic flooding. Associated Press photo by Greg Pearson — President George W. Bush walks with Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, left, and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Monday, Sept. 5, 2005, as they make their way into the state’s Office of Emergency Preparedness for a briefing after Hurricane Katrina. Associated Press photo by Greg Pearson — President George W. Bush walks with Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, left, and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Monday, Sept. 5, 2005, as they make their way into the state’s Office of Emergency Preparedness for a briefing after Hurricane Katrina

It took nearly three centuries to build the New Orleans that stood on Aug. 28, 2005, and just hours to […]

6/20/2015 | Read Story »

Governor Jindal And Netchex CEO Will Boudreaux Announce Company’s 240-Job Expansion In Covington Office

MANDEVILLE, LA — Today, Governor Bobby Jindal and Netchex founder and CEO Will Boudreaux announced the company will establish a […]

6/18/2015 | Read Story »

Governor Jindal and First Bauxite CEO Alan Roughead Announce Proposed $200 Million Bauxite Processing Investment in Louisiana

BATON ROUGE— Today, Governor Bobby Jindal and President and CEO Alan Roughead of First Bauxite Corp. of Canada announced the […]

6/18/2015 | Read Story »

BRAC and GNO team up on joint recruiting trip to Germany

Executives from the Baton Rouge Area Chamber and GNO Inc. are spending the week together in Germany on a joint […]

6/16/2015 | Read Story »

Major League Gaming Announces World Finals In New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS – Major League Gaming, the longest running eSports league in the world, announced Monday it will be partnering […]

6/9/2015 | Read Story »

New Orleans to host Major League Gaming finals

New Orleans has finally snagged another Superbowl … for video gamers, at least. Major League Gaming has announced that the […]

6/9/2015 | Read Story »

Groups Join Forces for Future Building Fridays

On Friday, June 5, Greater New Orleans, Inc (GNO Inc.) and the New Orleans Business Alliance will join the Community […]

6/3/2015 | Read Story »